Editor’s Note: A new year is a great time to try something, well, new. Here’s some inspiration from Young Lawyers Division (YLD) Treasurer Emily Kelchen. This was originally published in Dictum, the YLD newsletter. Kelchen is a freelance lobbyist and attorney marketing consultant.

I’m not by any means athletic. And my idea of enjoying the great outdoors is grilling out on the patio with a cold beverage. So why in the world would I decide to take up golf? To paraphrase The Godfather, it’s not personal; it’s business.

I took up golf because I got tired of being the person stuck in the office whenever my coworkers were participating in a golf tournament. It made sense for me to be the one left behind since I didn’t know how to play, but it was disappointing.

So, I decided to take some lessons so I could also take an afternoon off every once in awhile. I bought a cheap set of clubs and signed up for a golf class. I was incredibly intimidated because I viewed golf as something you have to be athletic or introduced to at a young age to find worthwhile, but I was determined to find out what I was missing out on.

My county has a public course with pros who offer very reasonably priced group and personal lessons (and clubs you can borrow if you don’t have your own). I also went golfing with a friend who played golf in college who was excited to give me some pointers. Tip: Spend the extra money to learn from a pro and ignore your friend’s advice. You’ll learn more and keep your friendship intact.

After my lessons ended, I started playing after work a few times a month. Sometimes my husband or a friend would play with me, but I was often placed with people I had never met before. I quickly learned that even people who are ‘good’ at golf make terrible shots all the time. My horrible drives and time spent in the sand traps were par for the course. (No pun intended.) The only time I embarrassed myself was when I broke a rule of golf etiquette. (My cart driving has not injured anyone, but I’ve promised to be more careful.)

My time spent on the course has given me a new hobby that I enjoy, but I have not forgotten that I took up the sport in part to advance my career. That was a good move. Golf is a great way to meet new people and add to your network. You are spending a few hours with other people who have a common interest, are enduring a common struggle, and you come out the other side with a new acquaintance.

I’m incredibly glad I let my want of an afternoon or two out of the office overcome my hesitations and misconceptions.

 ” data-reactid=”11″>Inspiration for the New Year: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Game of Golf

Editor’s Note: A new year is a great time to try something, well, new. Here’s some inspiration from Young Lawyers Division (YLD) Treasurer Emily Kelchen. This was originally published in Dictum, the YLD newsletter. Kelchen is a freelance lobbyist and attorney marketing consultant.

I’m not by any means athletic. And my idea of enjoying the great outdoors is grilling out on the patio with a cold beverage. So why in the world would I decide to take up golf? To paraphrase The Godfather, it’s not personal; it’s business.

I took up golf because I got tired of being the person stuck in the office whenever my coworkers were participating in a golf tournament. It made sense for me to be the one left behind since I didn’t know how to play, but it was disappointing.

So, I decided to take some lessons so I could also take an afternoon off every once in awhile. I bought a cheap set of clubs and signed up for a golf class. I was incredibly intimidated because I viewed golf as something you have to be athletic or introduced to at a young age to find worthwhile, but I was determined to find out what I was missing out on.

My county has a public course with pros who offer very reasonably priced group and personal lessons (and clubs you can borrow if you don’t have your own). I also went golfing with a friend who played golf in college who was excited to give me some pointers. Tip: Spend the extra money to learn from a pro and ignore your friend’s advice. You’ll learn more and keep your friendship intact.

After my lessons ended, I started playing after work a few times a month. Sometimes my husband or a friend would play with me, but I was often placed with people I had never met before. I quickly learned that even people who are ‘good’ at golf make terrible shots all the time. My horrible drives and time spent in the sand traps were par for the course. (No pun intended.) The only time I embarrassed myself was when I broke a rule of golf etiquette. (My cart driving has not injured anyone, but I’ve promised to be more careful.)

My time spent on the course has given me a new hobby that I enjoy, but I have not forgotten that I took up the sport in part to advance my career. That was a good move. Golf is a great way to meet new people and add to your network. You are spending a few hours with other people who have a common interest, are enduring a common struggle, and you come out the other side with a new acquaintance.

I’m incredibly glad I let my want of an afternoon or two out of the office overcome my hesitations and misconceptions.