Latest News: Golfer Mickelson used an admissions consultant

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SAN FRANCISCO (Swing Update) – The latest news of a corruption scandal in a college that resulted in charges against coaches and celebrities (all local times):

12:25

Golfer Phil Mickelson is said to be among "thousands" of people who have resorted to a university consulting firm accused of orchestrating a massive corruption plan.

Mickelson said Thursday on Twitter that his family had been "shocked" by the recent revelations about William "Rick" Singer. Mickelson pointed out that his family was not involved in any fraud.

The golfer has not been charged or implicated in the corruption scandal.

Federal prosecutors said Singer had spearheaded a ploy in which wealthy parents had bought sports coaches and other officials to get their kids into prestigious universities. More than 50 people have been charged.

Mickelson's daughter attends Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island.

The university has not responded to a request for comment.

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12:20

Lawyers suing universities in connection with a college admissions scandal have revised their lawsuit to include less prestigious school-based plaintiffs.

The lawyers on Thursday filed an amended lawsuit in federal court in San Francisco.

The original lawsuit was brought on behalf of two students at Stanford University who alleged that they had been wronged because they were denied a fair opportunity to be admitted to the schools where they applied.

Legal experts have stated that it was a difficult argument to argue since the two female students, Erica Olsen and Kalea Woods, have entered the elite college.

The revised lawsuit abandons Olsen and includes students from Tulane University, an unnamed community college and Rutgers University.

More than 50 people were charged earlier this week in the scandal.

Prosecutors said wealthy parents had paid to create standardized scores and bribed sports coaches to get their kids into elite universities.

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24:15

Hallmark says she's cutting ties with actress Lori Loughlin as a result of her arrest in a sweeping case of scams at the university.

In a statement released Thursday, Hallmark's parent company said it was "saddened" by the recent allegations.

Hallmark Cards Inc. has announced that it will no longer work with Loughlin and has ceased to develop all related productions.

Loughlin is a major presence of Hallmark and its Crown Media Family Networks, including the flagship channel, Hallmark Channel.

She is a long-time star in the chain's Christmas movies, and also participates in her films "Mystery Garage Sale" and the "When Calls the Heart" series.

Loughlin's lawyer, Perry Visconti, did not immediately respond to an e-mail requesting a comment.

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11:45

According to legal experts, it is unlikely that a lawsuit against a university in the context of a college admissions scandal will result, in part because the named plaintiffs are currently students of the college. 39, Stanford University.

The complaint filed Wednesday in federal court in San Francisco states that both students were injured because they were denied a fair opportunity to be admitted to the schools where they enrolled.

But lawyers say it's a hard argument to defend since the two students, Erica Olsen and Kalea Woods, entered the elite Stanford University. Experts say they still expect further prosecution.

More than 50 people were charged earlier this week in the scandal.

Prosecutors said wealthy parents had paid to create standardized scores and bribed sports coaches to get their children into elite universities

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11:30 am

Hallmark Channel is known for its holidays and shows with a happy ending.

But the arrest of actress Lori Loughlin as part of a corruption ploy at universities has created a challenge for the family-friendly cable channel. Loughlin's career and the chain are intimately linked.

She is one of the so-called "queens of Christmas" who complete a list of popular holiday films. Loughlin also plays in the ongoing "Garage Sale Mysteries" and Hallmark's "When Calls the Heart" series.

Market strategist Laura Ries says the question of whether the public can separate Loughlin from the characters she plays is an open question.

Hallmark says it's "monitor developments".

Loughlin and her husband, fashion designer Mossimo Giannulli, are among dozens of parents accused of guaranteeing their child's university admission with bribes and falsified exams. Their lawyer declined to comment.

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11:10

The University of Texas at Austin is defending itself against a lawsuit alleging that it would have played a role in a major corruption plan in colleges.

University officials on Wednesday issued a statement in which they said they were "outraged" by the project and said the alleged alleged acts at the school were perpetrated by "a UT employee."

The school was one of the people cited in a lawsuit filed by the federal government in San Francisco, saying the students had not been given the opportunity to be admitted. The University of Southern California and Yale University are also targeted.

Federal prosecutors indicted more than 50 people earlier this week as part of a ploy in which wealthy parents bribed sports coaches and other officials to send their children to elite colleges.

Officials from the University of Texas have stated that the allegations "do not reflect our admissions process".

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8:35

Two students filed lawsuits against the University of Southern California, Yale University and other colleges where prosecutors said their parents had paid bribes to guarantee the admission of their children.

The lawsuit was filed Wednesday in federal court in San Francisco and claims that students were denied a fair opportunity to be admitted.

Erica Olsen and Kalea Woods say they have been denied a fair opportunity to apply to Yale and USC.

According to them, the alleged ploy would have allowed "unqualified students" to enter "highly selective universities".

The lawsuit also named the University of California at Los Angeles, Wake Forest, Georgetown University and others.

More than 50 people were charged earlier this week.

Prosecutors said wealthy parents had paid to create standardized scores and bribed sports coaches to get their kids into elite universities.

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